Burl C.'s blog

Trouble the Water

August 29, 2005 is a date that some will remember more than others. This is the day that hurricane Katrina struck Louisiana. Most of the documentaries about hurricane Katrina have been about the storm itself: the winds, the rains, the intensity, the levees and the flooding. Trouble the Water is a first-hand account of the storm told through the perspective of two local residents of the ninth ward, a husband and wife. They stayed in their attic throughout the storm and managed to film as much of it as possible. The scenes in this documentary are absolutely real as well as the hardships and tragedies of the couple involved. Be prepared to laugh and cry as this documentary piques a full range of emotions. If you click on the link above you'll find that the library's catalog has another embedded link to click on which will take you to the official website of the documentary and you can view the trailer there.

Judgment day: Intelligent design on trial

Yesterday I watched, "Judgment Day: Intelligent Design on Trial." This is a documentary about the Dover, Pennsylvania's public school system and its legal battle over whether or not to teach "Intelligent Design" alongside evolution. Of course there are two sides to every story, but one would not expect a small public school system to be in federal court on constitutional challenges to the first amendment.

The End of Poverty?

Over the weekend I watched "The End of Poverty." This film has been in just about all of the previews of other new documentaries that I've watched so I thought it had to be a good one. The preview (see below) does grab your attention, but after watching it, I have mixed feelings about it.

We all know that poverty exists and there are some individual choices we can make to help those in need, but I don't see how we can completely reorganize our entire country to help poorer countries. Would the sum of all individuals make a collective decision to consume less and conserve more energy? That seems to be the rhetorical question that the film is asking. The answer lies with us.

 

Mugabe and the White African

Life is hard enough without the added pressures of the truly horrific and ugly things that people can do to one another. Without straying into the politics of race and class in Zimbabwe Africa, this documentary follows a white farmer from Zimbabwe as he continues his court battle to keep is land after Robert Mugabe, the president, changes the Zimbabwe constitution and starts a new land redistribution program. The Blacks from Zimbabwe don't want the Whites to be there and the Whites don't want to leave nor do they have anywhere else they can go since they are "legal" citizens of the country. The White farmers were eventually forced from their land when their property was burned down. The police and the military would not protect them. Some of the farmers are dead, some have disappeared and others have moved to Harare.
Warning: The extreme acts of violence contained in this documentary may be triggering to some.

 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Burl C.'s blog