Sci-Fi

Another Kind

Deep in the desert, not too far from infamous Area 51, is a government facility called the Playroom. In this secret facility are a group of six kids, who are not-quite-human. While the Playroom is a refuge for them, it is also an enclosure. A security breach soon propels them into the world––a world dangerous for "irregularities." Before they know it, this group of clever and funny kids is being hunted by employees of the government, UFO conspiracy theorists, and a mysterious and malevolent "Collector."

This graphic novel features a cast of diverse characters searching for a place to call home, as well as incredible art and some snarky, funny dialogue. If you like books with adventure & beautiful art, a high-stakes plot (without any world ending), and cryptids(!), check it out.

   
Tween   
Think Library    Kids    Reviews   

Sci-Fi Fanzine Archives

One of the earliest international zine cultures was born out of science fiction fandom. Starting in the 1930s, science fiction fans began to publish what they called fanzines. These were usually collections of fan content and a community dialog. Many sci-fi writers got their start writing for and publishing fan zines. These zines usually consisted of content like reviews, trip reports, and letters to the editors. You can learn more about their history in the Zinebook article From Fandom to Feminism: An Analysis of the Zine Press by Heath Row.

   
Connect    Sci-Fi   
Zines   

Staff Picks: Animorphs series

Before she was known for releases like Crenshaw and the Newbery award winning The One and Only Ivan, Katherine Applegate brought the Animorphs saga to the world. The series shows Applegate's impressive skill as a writer, as she weaves an accessible sci-fi story of epic sweep and exciting action sequences with surprisingly sophisticated world-building and affecting character development. The narrative also touches on themes regarding the traumas of war (through a kid-friendly lens) and mankind's relationship to the environment. All of the above is spread across the series in books of digestible length. Appropriate for ages ~7+, but contains a level of depth that can engross readers of any age!

   
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Kids    Reviews   

Staff Picks: The Firefly Code

Reviewed by Ginny H. 

In this adventurous, science fiction story, Mori lives a perfect life in Old Harmonie. Their town is a utopian community where kids are genetically altered to super-enhance a powerful trait, like puzzle solving, physical agility, or photographic memory. But when a strangely perfect new girl named Ilana moves in, Mori and her friends begin to question the only world they have ever known. 

Check out The Firefly Code by Megan Frazer Blakemore! 

   
Adventure    Read    Sci-Fi   
Kids   

Celebrate Star Wars Reads!

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Can you believe it’s been 40 years since Star Wars first made the jump into theaters? Since then it's been taking the world by force, igniting the imaginations of fans of all ages.

Every October, we celebrate this bounty of books with a special holiday—Star Wars Reads. Over the years, books have become a great way to expand on the stories set in the Star Wars galaxy.

Looking for a book to pique the interest of your young Star Wars fan? Try these fun Star Wars Reads!

   
Sci-Fi   
Kids   

Wires and Nerve Vol. 1 by Marissa Meyer

Wires and Nerve picks up after the events of Winter (and Cinder, Scarlett, and Cress) so STOP RIGHT NOW if you haven't read those books. Actually, what's wrong with you? Go read those! They're so good! Start with Cinder, you're welcome.

Iko, the android who loves pretty clothes and shoes is also a butt kicking secret agent. She's been sent to Earth to round up the remaining rogue mutant soldiers from Luna and send them home to face justice, but every once in awhile one of them will slip away from her. Cinder tells her not to worry, but Iko can't help but feel like she's failing by not getting every single soldier safely away from Earth. Now it seems like she might be right, these soldiers are coming together in a way that threatens everyone Iko loves.

   
Think Library    Teens    Reviews   

Scythe by Neal Shusterman

Death has been defeated and world peace achieved. With the guidance of Artificial Intelligence, humanity has ushered in a utopia…. mostly. In Scythe, Neal Shusterman posits that AI has evolved into an omniscient (and omnibenevolent) force called the Thunderhead, through which the world has achieved a true and lasting peace. The Thunderhead controls everything, but unlike many dystopian works, this is a miraculous and profoundly beneficial event. The only power that the Thunderhead does not possess is the ability to take life. That responsibility is assigned to Scythes, who roam the world utilizing quotas to randomly glean (aka kill) in order to keep earth’s population in check.

   
Scythe   
Think Library    Teens    Reviews   

Paper Girls by Brian Vaughan

If you liked Stranger Things, read Paper Girls by Brian Vaughan. Vaughan, author of Saga, utilizes many of the same elements as Stranger Things: independent children, other worlds, absent parents (seriously, where are the parents?), and otherworldly monsters. The story begins as several twelve year-old paper girls bike their evening route on Halloween, 1988. What starts as a normal shift grows stranger and more supernatural by the hour. The main character, Erin, is delivering papers, when she is accosted by strange boys in Halloween costumes. Another group of paper girls rescues her and they agree to travel together for safety, but along the way they realize that people in town have started to disappear.

   
Sci-Fi    Suspense   
Think Library    Teens    Reviews   

Darth Vader Vol. 1 by Kieron Gillen

Star Wars Darth Vader: Vol. 1 by Kieron Gillen fills in a necessary gap in the Star Wars canon, and could help fill the time before Star Wars: Rogue One arrives in theaters. Gillen’s Vader is trying to learn the identity of the young pilot who destroyed the Death Star, as well as regain the favor of Emperor Palpatine after failing to stop the Rebel Alliance. As Vader goes on these dual missions, he is forced to hire agents who can act as his public face. Navigating all of these situations and relationships, as well as his personal quest for vengeance against the Rebellion and suspicions about secrets in the Empire, create a world of intrigue and violence for this story to play out. Gillen balances all of these elements superbly and also unleashes Vader, using battle sequences and displays of the Force to remind readers why Vader is one of the most feared individuals in the galaxy.

   
Think Library    Teens    Reviews   

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