Library Program

Books Plus Holiday Tea

Holiday TeaAs the weather turns cold and blustery and sunset comes earlier and earlier there's nothing better than to curl up with a good book.

Next Sunday, we'll have our annual holiday tea. Amal will bring her delicious cake and the Friends of the Library will provide lovely desserts and fruit as well as hot drinks. But the best ingredient is YOU!

Please come and share the titles of books that you have enjoyed this year and with your ideas for new Books Plus programs in 2012. We will also have lists of recommended books for 2011.

November's Books Plus and Author Visit

Miracle at St. AnnaAs the leaves turn bright orange and the cold weather returns, it feels great to curl up with a good book. Why not transport yourself back to Italy during World War II with James McBride's Miracle at St. Anna? Join us for a book discussion this coming Sunday. Also, the MCPL Friends of the Library will be hosting "An Evening with James McBride" on November 12th. If you can come to both events, that would be great. If not, we hope to see you at our Books Plus talk.

McBride, who also wrote the best-selling memoir The Color of Water about growing up in a mixed-race family, is also a jazz musician. Miracle of St. Anna tells the story of a soldier in the 92nd all-black Buffalo Division during World War II. Four of these GIs take care of a traumatized Italian boy. The book examines issues of race, war, and evil as well as the nature of love and caring.

For more details of this and future programs, please see below.
Books Plus meets the first Sunday of each month. All are welcome. Join the discussion or simply come to listen.
2 p.m., First Sundays


Festival of Ghost Stories, Friday 10/28

Several of the Children's Librarians, members of the Bloomington Storytellers Guild, will be telling spooky stories at Bryan Park this Friday, 7-8:30 pm, as part of our annual Festival of Ghost Stories. Not intended for young children, this free event is a chance for older children, teens and adults to enjoy hearing some spine-tingling tales. So grab a lawn chair, or bring a blanket, and join us for some stories - and a couple songs - certain to give you the shivers!

Click Clack Moo: A Special Preview Performance

As a student of journalism, I am a true believer in the power of the written word. And, apparently, so are the cows in Doreen Cronin's hilarious picture book: Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type. When the cows discover a typewriter in their barn, they begin making demands of Farmer Brown. It's cold in the barn. They want electric blankets.

Ridiculous, thinks Farmer Brown, and he refuses their request. But then the cows refuse to give any more milk. And the hens join the cows in solidarity and refuse to give any more eggs. The duck is the barnyard mediator, shuffling typed messages back and forth between the farmer and the cows. But, it seems that even ducks have desires for creature comforts.

One Book One Bloomington Voting!

One BookWhat if everyone in our local community all read and discussed the same book? This year we read the excellent Let the Great World Spin by Colum McCann and I am certainly looking forward to next year's selection as well.

As in the past, we are asking the community what they want to read together in 2012. It's time to vote!

September's Books Plus Discussion

Major PettigrewBoth a British comedy of errors and a sweet love story, Major Pettigrew's Last Stand has enough to please a wide range of readers. Major Pettigrew is retired and living a quiet widow's life in a small town in Sussex. As his friendship with Mrs. Ali, the Pakistani shopkeeper, becomes something more, complications - both large and small, funny and serious - arise. Join us to discuss Simonson's first novel next week during our monthly Books Plus book discussion.

For more details of this and future programs, please see below.
Books Plus meets the first Sunday of each month. All are welcome. Join the discussion or simply come to listen.
2 p.m., First Sundays

Bark, George and other Stories for Dog Days

Join us this Wednesday, August 31, at 10 am in the Library Auditorium for Storyhour Extravaganza! Since the hot days of August are often described as the Dog Days of Summer, we're celebrating the end of this blistering season with a variety of stories about dogs - including my personal favorite: Bark, George by Jules Feiffer.

August Books Plus

Art of Racing in the RainIt's hard to believe we will soon be entering the dog days of August. And speaking of dogs, our book for discussion this month features a lab-terrier mix, the very lovable Enzo, who does all that he can to pull a family together during a custody battle. And what can be more interesting than a philosophical dog? In The Art of Racing in the Rain Enzo is sure that next time around, he will return as a human being. But is he already human enough? Come join Elizabeth next Sunday in discussing this wonderful dog and his great love for his family.

For more details of this and future programs, please see below.
Books Plus meets the first Sunday of each month. All are welcome. Join the discussion or simply come to listen.
2 p.m., First Sundays

Library Carnival on Monday!

Did you get to go to the Monroe County Fair this year? We hope you stopped by the library's booth, went on our mini jungle walk and pet our giant stuffed orangutan! You can visit with the orangutan this Monday night between 6 and 7:30 pm. He will be welcoming everyone to our Library Carnival in Meeting Rooms 1A, B and C. We'll have games, prizes and ice cream treats for you to enjoy. And it's all free -- thanks to the Friends of the Library!

July's Books Plus Discussion

Immortal Life of Henrietta LacksJoin us this Sunday, July 10 at 2:00 p.m. for July's Books Plus book discussion. Wendy will lead a discussion on The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. Scientists named a poor African-American tobacco farmer HeLA. Without her or her family's knowledge, they removed some of Henrietta's cells. They became the first so-called "immortal" cells grown in a laboratory and were used for many vaccines including the polio vaccine. Decades later, they also used her husband's and children's cells without their consent. The book brings up many interesting questions: do we own the rights to our own bodies, do scientists treat research subjects differently based on race and class, and why do scientists not always communicate what they are doing to the people most involved.

Please join us for an interesting discussion on a book that many have found fascinating.

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