One Million Minutes!

A Summer Reading Progress bar showing 1,000,000 minutes.

1,102,067! That’s how many minutes you read as part of the Library’s 2020 Summer Reading Games, which went digital this year. 1,574 participants (815 kids, 178 teens, and 581 adults) completed challenges, reviewed books, and logged their minutes read.

The Summer Reading Games couldn’t happen without the support of the Friends of the Monroe County Public Library! Not only did the Friends sponsor the annual summer reading program, they pledged to donate $2,000 to Hoosier Hills Food Bank if the Library’s community-wide reading goal of 200,000 minutes was met. 

The goal was met less than two weeks into the games and the check was presented to the food bank!

The president of the Friends of the Library Board presents a check for a check to representatives from the Hoosier Hills Food Bank.

Because the initial goal was achieved so quickly, the stakes were raised with a stretch goal of 1 million minutes! Should the new goal be met, some individual Library staff pledged donations to the following local organizations totaling $1,525. 

  • Shalom Community Center
  • Hotels 4 Homeless
  • Middle Way House
  • Banneker Community Center
  • Stages Bloomington
  • Friends of the Library

Monroe County readers responded, surpassing 1 million minutes on July 27, with just four days to go! 

Readers earned badges and tickets towards prize drawings for the minutes they read and the challenges they completed. Prizes included LaunchPad tablets, headphones, Kindle Fire tablets, gift cards to local business, and more. Winners are being notified now! 

Throughout the summer, additional monetary donations served as benchmark prizes within the games, benefiting Shalom Community Center, Youth Services Bureau, and Stepping Stones. Hundreds of books were also donated to local Little Free Libraries and to area daycares and camp groups, including The Nest, the daycare at New Hope for Families

While in-person events weren’t possible this summer, Library staff hosted dozens of virtual programs through YouTube and Zoom. The three most popular programs were Sam Tries: Origami, Painting Weatherproof Pots, and Yummy Food: Virtual Storytime! These programs, and many more, can be viewed anytime on the Library’s YouTube Channel.

Although the 2020 Summer Reading Games looked different than previous years, you took the changes in stride and embraced the online challenge, continuing the summer reading tradition and allowing the Library to support local organizations in need! Congratulations!

Indiana 2-1-1: 24/7 Confidential and Free Support for Hoosiers

Indiana 2-1-1: Get Connected, Get Help

Adapting to life during the coronavirus pandemic is a challenge. Almost every aspect of daily life, from shopping at a grocery store to visiting the public library, has changed. Many have lost their jobs or are working reduced hours. Some are experiencing food or housing insecurity for the first time. Others have lost loved ones. Uncertain times can feel overwhelming and isolating, especially when you are unable to congregate in the community, and may not know who to turn to in order to ask for support.

For Hoosiers in need of help accessing local resources in Monroe County, Indiana 2-1-1 has a team of Community Navigators available to provide expert referrals to services in our community. 2-1-1 Community Navigators are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to assist residents seeking a variety of resources such as food and clothing, mental health and addiction services, healthcare, housing and utility assistance, education and employment, parenting support, tax assistance, and more.

To speak to a Community Navigator by phone, dial 2-1-1 or (866) 211-9966. A texting option is available as well. Hoosiers can text their zip code to 898-211 during the hours of 8 AM–5 PM EST, Monday through Friday, and communicate with a Community Navigator directly via text.

Additionally, a database of resources is available online at in211.org. This includes information on how 2-1-1 is involved in the COVID-19 response and answers to frequently asked questions about the pandemic.

Indiana 2-1-1 reported a 69% increase in domestic violence-related calls between April and May of this year, and their top five Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) information needs calls for May were for housing, utility assistance, food and meals, transportation, and legal, consumer, and public. If you or someone you know needs assistance finding local resources in Monroe County, you are not alone. Indiana 2-1-1 is a free and confidential option available to all Hoosiers seeking help.

Staff Picks: Stand Up, Yumi Chung!

Reviewed by Cidne B., Information Assistant

Integrity

Yumi Chung would really like to be doing stand up comedy like her Youtube hero, Jasmine Jaspar. But being the youngest daughter of Korean immigrants, and incredibly shy, this seems like a silly dream. Then one day, after her summer SSAT prep classes, she discovers a comedy camp everything changes; a case of mistaken identity gives her the chance to be someone else and to get a taste of her dream! 

Stand Up, Yumi Chung! by Jessica Kim is a relatable, engaging middle grade novel that deals with the themes of familial responsibility, identity, integrity, friendship, and bravery. Appropriate for ages 9+

This is review is part of the Finding Value series, inspired by the eleven core values central to the Library's mission. Tune in as Library staff review books and movies that highlight the values accessibility, civil discourse, inclusiveness, integrity, intellectual freedom, lifelong learning, literacy, respect, safety, service, and stewardship.

Join the Big Library Read, the World’s Largest Digital Book Club

Big Library Read, August 3 - August 17, 2020

The historical fiction thriller, The Darwin Affair by Tim Mason, is the 22nd selection of Big Library Read. From August 3–17 readers can borrow and read this “intellectually stimulating and viscerally exciting” eBook through OverDrive and the Libby app. Solve the mystery from home with your library card and no waiting, then discuss the book online!

A historical fiction novel, The Darwin Affair takes place in London during June 1860. When an assassination attempt is made on Queen Victoria, and a petty thief is gruesomely murdered moments later, Detective Inspector Charles Field quickly surmises that these crimes are connected to an even more sinister plot. Soon, Field’s investigation exposes a shocking conspiracy in which the publication of Charles Darwin’s controversial On the Origin of Species sets off a string of murders, arson, kidnapping, and the pursuit of a madman named the Chorister. As he edges closer to the Chorister, Field uncovers dark secrets that were meant to remain forever hidden. Tim Mason has created a rousing page-turner that both Charles Dickens and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle would relish and envy.

Big Library Read is available in over 22,000 libraries around the world, including more than 90 percent of public libraries in North America. Connecting readers around the world, Big Library Read began in 2013 and takes place tri-annually. The program is facilitated by OverDrive, the leading digital reading platform for popular eBooks, audiobooks, and magazines.

The Darwin Affair was published by Algonquin Books and can be read on all major computers and devices through Libby or libbyapp.com, including iPhone®, iPad®, Android™ phones and tablets, and Chromebook™ without waitlists or holds. Through Libby, readers can also “send to Kindle®”. The title will automatically expire at the end of the lending period, and there are no late fees.

To join the discussion, learn about past Big Library Read titles, and download Libby, visit Big Library Read's website! Learn more about how to use OverDrive with your library card

Quaranzine, Vol. 3

Quaranzine Vol. 3

Welcome to the third issue of the Library's community Quaranzine!

There are two different versions––one is for reading on a screen, and the other has been imposed so it can be printed at home, folded, stapled, and read in that fashion. Select short-side binding on most printers to print correctly.

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this zine. Please consider contributing to the next issue, coming September 1!

This is the third publication during the era of COVID-19, and each time these zines, and the spirit of our Bloomington community, keeps getting stronger. With projects like this one, you connect with one another, get a glimpse of how others are truly feeling and thinking, and embark on a larger project together—to publish and create art. Thank you, truly, for all that continue to contribute to this project, those who are newly contributing, and for those who read it. We thank you, we care about you, and you are appreciated.

Being in quarantine for the past three months has been a struggle for every person, albeit in many different ways. While some may be sitting with the peace and reflective time with resolve, some may be bored and aching for physical collaborative life again, and some are struggling with very real issues of housing, food, and education. During this time, it is imperative to check in with your community members and help when it is possible, in whatever ways you can. A simple phone call to check in with a friend may be the difference between them having a hard mental health day and them finding some hope. Conversely, if you are struggling, don’t be afraid to reach out. Friends and family can be a great outlet for help, and may have positive isolation ideas, although there are many resources via telephone, online, or through the Library to help find community elsewhere. We are all in this together.

Per usual, this zine continues to be created as a collaboration between people who express their creativity in different ways, be that through poetry, drawing or painting, digital art, or collaging. Please consider contributing to our next Quaranzine! We love this project and will continue to make zines through this time of isolation and COVID-19. We are accepting new submissions for the next Quaranzine through August 29.

For ideas on other zines to check out, please browse mcpl.info/zines. In this blog, we highlight different zine archives that do a great job of keeping up with updated and pertinent digital zines.

Thank you to all that contributed to this project, or that are taking the time to read our zine! We can’t wait to “see” you again next month.

call_for_submissions_vol_4_facebook.png

Want to contribute to the next volume?

Send your art and thoughts in the form of an 8.5” x 5.5” page of words or images, a photograph or an image, or about 250 words about something. Recipes, pictures, fun projects, and more––all ideas that highlight the community and uplift voices are encouraged and welcome!

Please reach out to quaranzine [at] mcpl.info with any questions or entries. Submissions for the fourth volume will be accepted through August 29. Submissions will be compiled and posted to this site by early September.

Staff Picks: Law and Order

Law and Order Documentary Cover

Reviewed by Craig C., Senior Materials Handler

Law and Order, a documentary directed by Frederick Wiseman, is available to stream with Kanopy.

SafetyWith protests about police violence continuing nationwide and calls for defunding and reform, it’s instructive to watch the 1969 documentary Law and Order. Filmed on the streets and in the precincts of Kansas City, Missouri’s police department, Frederick Wiseman’s film follows rank-and-file patrolmen as they respond to reports of domestic violence, theft, public drunkenness, a hit and run with a stolen car, vagrancy, prostitution, creating a public disturbance, an abandoned child, truancy, and a custody dispute.

In a few cases, the arresting officers use force that could be considered excessive, including putting a woman in a choke hold and telling her “Go on, resist.” There’s also a discussion of terminology to use with the public at a morning roll call which doesn’t quite sink in for one of the officers who feels singled out. The moment that sticks out most, though, is the casual discussion between two patrolmen in their cars about using tear gas during the recent protests. One even regrets not being able to throw his, an astonishing confession considering they’re both well aware they’re being filmed. In light of what we’re seeing now thanks to the proliferation of cell phone cameras, it’s clear the more some things change, the more they stay the same.

This is review is part of the Finding Value series, inspired by the eleven core values central to the Library's mission. Tune in as Library staff review books and movies that highlight the values accessibility, civil discourse, inclusiveness, integrity, intellectual freedom, lifelong learning, literacy, respect, safety, service, and stewardship. 

Staff Picks: Consent (for kids!)

In this 60 Second Review, Librarian Kim shares the graphic novel Consent (for Kids!) : Boundaries, Respect, and Being in Charge of You by Rachel Brian. It's also available as an ebook through CloudLibrary! For more video reviews subscribe to our YouTube Channel and check the Finding Value: 60 Second Reviews playlist

This review is part of the Finding Value series, inspired by the eleven core values central to our mission. Tune in as Library staff review books and movies that highlight the values accessibility, civil discourse, inclusiveness, integrity, intellectual freedom, lifelong learning, literacy, respect, safety, service, and stewardship. 

Staff Picks: Monkey and Me

In this 60 Second Review, Librarian Ginny shares the picture book Monkey and Me by Emily Gravett and talks about how it connects with early literacy themes. For more video reviews subscribe to our YouTube Channel and check the Finding Value: 60 Second Reviews playlist

This review is part of the Finding Value series, inspired by the eleven core values central to our mission. Tune in as Library staff review books and movies that highlight the values accessibility, civil discourse, inclusiveness, integrity, intellectual freedom, lifelong learning, literacy, respect, safety, service, and stewardship. 

Staff Picks: Race to the Sun

In this 60 Second Review, Librarian Ginny shares the book Race to the Sun by Rebecca Roanhorse. This inclusive chapter book is also available as an ebook through CloudLibrary and Hoopla! For more video reviews subscribe to our YouTube Channel and check the Finding Value: 60 Second Reviews playlist

This review is part of the Finding Value series, inspired by the eleven core values central to our mission. Tune in as Library staff review books and movies that highlight the values accessibility, civil discourse, inclusiveness, integrity, intellectual freedom, lifelong learning, literacy, respect, safety, service, and stewardship. 

Staff Picks: Right Now, Wrong Then

Reviewed by Dean M., Materials Handler

Right Now, Wrong Then directed by Hong Sang-Soo is also available to stream on Hoopla.

Integrity

This autobiographically inspired story is about a Korean film director, Han Chun-su, who meets Hee-jung, a young painter, while on a business trip. He arrives a day ahead of schedule and has time to waste as he walks around and looks at buildings and structures. The two characters meet randomly at a temple-like structure and agree to have coffee, talk about life, art and other things. Hee-jung says she knows about the Han's work and that she enjoys his films. Hee-jung allows Han to follow her around the city and they grow fonder of each other as the film moves on.

The film is shot in two parts. The first part is what is "wrong", and the second part is what is "right". It is essentially the same story told twice, but with subtle yet profound variations in each part. This works somewhat like a butterfly effect for how each of the two parallel parts end. For example, in part one Han fails to admit that he is married until the end of the night. This leads the Hee-jung to completely reject the romantic feelings that were building, obviously. In part two, Han discloses that he is married earlier on in the narrative, causing the two characters to have a nice ending to their adventures. 

In the second part of the film, Han values moral integrity by being honest with the Hee-jung. The value of integrity and honesty is a major difference between the second and first parts. This film shows how it can be beneficial to have moral integrity as a value and to practice it. Right Now, Wrong Then was directed by Hong Sang-Soo, a Korean filmmaker who often writes his screenplays autobiographically. He is a professor of film and his film crews consist largely of pupils who are more willing to help than to get reimbursed. The Library owns several of Sang-Soo's other films, which are also recommended.

This is review is part of the Finding Value series, inspired by the eleven core values central to the Library's mission. Tune in as Library staff review books and movies that highlight the values accessibility, civil discourse, inclusiveness, integrity, intellectual freedom, lifelong learning, literacy, respect, safety, service, and stewardship.

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