History

Marching Home: Union Veterans and Their Unending Civil War

Traditional Civil War histories have concluded in 1865, with a bitterly won peace and Union soldiers returning triumphantly home. Civil War historian Brian Matthew Jordan creates an entirely new narrative. These veterans—tending rotting wounds, battling alcoholism, campaigning for paltry pensions— tragically realized that they stood as unwelcome reminders to a new America eager to heal, forget, and embrace the freewheeling bounty of the Gilded Age. —Publisher

Marching Home: Union Veterans and Their Unending Civil War

Brian Matthew Jordan
Adult Nonfiction - 973.708697 Jor

Traditional Civil War histories have concluded in 1865, with a bitterly won peace and Union soldiers returning triumphantly home. Civil War historian Brian Matthew Jordan creates an entirely new narrative. These veterans—tending rotting wounds, battling alcoholism, campaigning for paltry pensions— tragically realized that they stood as unwelcome reminders to a new America eager to heal, forget, and embrace the freewheeling bounty of the Gilded Age. —Publisher

Memorial Day

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

"Tells the true story of a British soldier who was held in a POW labor camp in the summer of 1944 and willingly smuggled himself into the Buna-Monowitz concentration camp—known as Auschwitz III—to witness firsthand the cruelty there." —Publisher

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz: A True Story of World War II

Denis Avery
Adult Nonfiction – 940.5318 Ave

"Tells the true story of a British soldier who was held in a POW labor camp in the summer of 1944 and willingly smuggled himself into the Buna-Monowitz concentration camp—known as Auschwitz III—to witness firsthand the cruelty there." —Publisher

Memorial Day

Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

"Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to be very close to Bin Laden with a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive." —Publisher

 Lone Survivor: The Eyewitness Account of Operation Redwing and the Lost Heroes of SEAL Team 10

Marcus Luttrell
Adult Nonfiction – 958.1047 Lut

"Four US Navy SEALS departed one clear night in early July 2005 for the mountainous Afghanistan-Pakistan border for a reconnaissance mission. Their task was to document the activity of an al Qaeda leader rumored to be very close to Bin Laden with a small army in a Taliban stronghold. Five days later, only one of those Navy SEALS made it out alive." —Publisher

Memorial Day

The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors: The Extraordinary World War II Story of the U.S. Navy's Finest Hour

On the morning of October 25, 1944, off the Philippine Island of Samar. On the horizon loomed the mightiest ships of the Japanese navy, a massive fleet that represented the last hope of a staggering empire. All that stood between it and Douglas MacArthur’s vulnerable invasion force were the U.S.S. Samuel B. Roberts and the other small ships of a tiny American flotilla poised to charge into history. —Publisher

The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors: The Extraordinary World War II Story of the U.S. Navy's Finest Hour

James Hornfischer
Adult Nonfiction – 940.5426 Ho

On the morning of October 25, 1944, off the Philippine Island of Samar. On the horizon loomed the mightiest ships of the Japanese navy, a massive fleet that represented the last hope of a staggering empire. All that stood between it and Douglas MacArthur’s vulnerable invasion force were the U.S.S. Samuel B. Roberts and the other small ships of a tiny American flotilla poised to charge into history. —Publisher

Memorial Day

The Ghosts of Hero Street: How One Small Mexican-American Community Gave So Much in World War II and Korea

"Twenty-two Mexican-American families who lived on that one street sent fifty-seven of their children to fight in World War II and Korea—more than any other place that size anywhere in the country. Today it's known as Hero Street. This is the story of those brave men and their families, how they fought both in battle and to be accepted in an American society that remained biased against them even after they returned home as heroes." —Publisher
The Ghosts of Hero Street: How One Small Mexican-American Community Gave So Much in World War II and Korea

Carlos Harrison
Adult Nonfiction – 305.86872 Har

"Twenty-two Mexican-American families who lived on that one street sent fifty-seven of their children to fight in World War II and Korea—more than any other place that size anywhere in the country. Today it's known as Hero Street. This is the story of those brave men and their families, how they fought both in battle and to be accepted in an American society that remained biased against them even after they returned home as heroes." —Publisher

Memorial Day

Ghost Soldiers: The Epic Account of World War II's Greatest Rescue Mission

On January 28, 1945, 121 hand-selected troops from the elite U.S. Army 6th Ranger Battalion slipped behind enemy lines in the Philippines in an attempt to rescue 513 American and British POWs. As the Rangers stealthily moved through enemy-occupied territory, they learned that instead of facing the few dozen prison guards, they could possibly confront as many as 8,000 battle-hardened enemy troops. —Publisher

Ghost Soldiers: The Epic Account of World War II's Greatest Rescue Mission

Hampton Sides
Adult Nonfiction – 940.5425 Sid

On January 28, 1945, 121 hand-selected troops from the elite U.S. Army 6th Ranger Battalion slipped behind enemy lines in the Philippines in an attempt to rescue 513 American and British POWs. As the Rangers stealthily moved through enemy-occupied territory, they learned that instead of facing the few dozen prison guards, they could possibly confront as many as 8,000 battle-hardened enemy troops. —Publisher

Memorial Day

Here Is Your War: Story of G.I. Joe

"Indiana's own award-winning World War II journalist Ernie Pyle 'tells how people from a cross-section of America—ranches, inner cities, small mountain farms, and college towns—learned to fight a war. The Allied campaign and ultimate victory in North Africa was built on blood, brave deeds, sacrifice and needless loss, exotic vistas, endurance, homesickness, and an unmistakable American sense of humor.'" —Publisher

Here Is Your War: Story of G.I. Joe

Ernie Pyle
Adult Nonfiction – 940.5423 Py

"Indiana's own award-winning World War II journalist Ernie Pyle 'tells how people from a cross-section of America—ranches, inner cities, small mountain farms, and college towns—learned to fight a war. The Allied campaign and ultimate victory in North Africa was built on blood, brave deeds, sacrifice and needless loss, exotic vistas, endurance, homesickness, and an unmistakable American sense of humor.'" —Publisher

Memorial Day

Day of Infamy

"In piecing together the saga of Pearl Harbor, Lord traveled over fourteen thousand miles and spoke or corresponded with over five hundred individuals who were there—not just the admirals and generals, but enlisted men and families as well. He visited each of the Hawaiian bases attacked and pored over maps, charts, letters, diaries, official files, newspapers, and some twenty-five thousand pages of testimony, discovering a wealth of information that had never before been revealed." —Publisher

Day of Infamy

Walter Lord
Adult Nonfiction – 940.5426 Lor

"In piecing together the saga of Pearl Harbor, Lord traveled over fourteen thousand miles and spoke or corresponded with over five hundred individuals who were there—not just the admirals and generals, but enlisted men and families as well. He visited each of the Hawaiian bases attacked and pored over maps, charts, letters, diaries, official files, newspapers, and some twenty-five thousand pages of testimony, discovering a wealth of information that had never before been revealed." —Publisher

Memorial Day

The Darkest Summer: Pusan and Inchon 1950: The Battles that Saved South Korea—and the Marines—from Extinction

"Draws on interviews with Korean War veterans to describe the first three months of the war, when one of the greatest reversals of military fortune not only saved South Korea from communist conquest but also rescued the Marine Corps from extinction." —Publisher
The Darkest Summer: Pusan and Inchon 1950: The Battles that Saved South Korea—and the Marines—from Extinction

Bill Sloan
Adult Nonfiction – 951.9042 Slo

"Draws on interviews with Korean War veterans to describe the first three months of the war, when one of the greatest reversals of military fortune not only saved South Korea from communist conquest but also rescued the Marine Corps from extinction." —Publisher

Memorial Day

Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors

On the sparkling morning of June 25, 1876, 611 men of the United States 7th Cavalry rode toward the banks of the Little Bighorn in the Montana Territory, where 3,000 Indians stood waiting for battle. The lives of two great warriors would soon be forever linked throughout history: Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General George Armstrong Custer. Both were men of aggression and supreme courage. Both became leaders in their societies at very early ages; both were stripped of power, in disgrace, and worked to earn back the respect of their people. And to both of them, the unspoiled grandeur of the Great Plains of North America was an irresistible challenge. Their parallel lives would pave the way, in a manner unknown to either, for an inevitable clash between two nations fighting for possession of the open prairie.

Crazy Horse and Custer: The Parallel Lives of Two American Warriors

Stephen E. Ambrose
Adult Nonfiction 973.8209 Amb

On the sparkling morning of June 25, 1876, 611 men of the United States 7th Cavalry rode toward the banks of the Little Bighorn in the Montana Territory, where 3,000 Indians stood waiting for battle. The lives of two great warriors would soon be forever linked throughout history: Crazy Horse, leader of the Oglala Sioux, and General George Armstrong Custer. Both were men of aggression and supreme courage. Both became leaders in their societies at very early ages; both were stripped of power, in disgrace, and worked to earn back the respect of their people. And to both of them, the unspoiled grandeur of the Great Plains of North America was an irresistible challenge. Their parallel lives would pave the way, in a manner unknown to either, for an inevitable clash between two nations fighting for possession of the open prairie.

Native American History

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