Recognizing Native Americans on Thanksgiving

Recognizing Native Americans on Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving isn’t all about pilgrims and turkey. Take a moment this holiday to acknowledge the experiences of Native Americans, in Indiana and beyond.


Compiled by:
Amber M.
1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

Charles C. Mann
Adult Nonfiction – 970.011 Ma

In a riveting and fast-paced history, massing archeological, anthropological, scientific and literary evidence, Mann debunks much of what we thought we knew about pre-Columbian America. The author also weighs the evidence that Native populations were far larger than previously calculated. Mann, a contributor to the Atlantic Monthly and Science, masterfully assembles a diverse body of scholarship into a first-rate history of Native America and its inhabitants. —Publishers Weekly


Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee: An Indian History of the American West

Dee Alexander Brown
Adult Nonfiction – 978.0049 Bro

An eloquent, fully documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative, told with force and clarity, that changed forever our vision of how the West was really won.

 


In the Hands of the Great Spirit: the 20,000 Year History of American Indians

Jake Page
Adult Nonfiction – 970.1 Pa

This superlative popular history of American Indian peoples distills two generations of scholarship into a rare combination of readability and reliability. A smooth, engaged narrative that fills an enormous gap in the popular historical literature. —Publishers Weekly

 


Native American Place Names of Indiana

Michael McCafferty
Adult Nonfiction – 977.2 Mcc

Impeccably researched, this study details who created each name, as well as when, where, how, and why they were used. The result is a detailed linguistic history of lakes, streams, cities, counties, and other Indiana names. Each entry includes native language forms, translations, and pronunciation guides, offering fresh historical insight into the state of Indiana.

 


The Native Americans

Elizabeth J. Glenn
Adult Nonfiction – 970.4 Gle

Native American ancestors inhabited the land of Indiana from around 9,500 BC; European contact with Indiana's Miami, Wea, Mascouten, and Shawnee tribes began in 1679. Many natives then either assimilated into white culture, or hid their identity. But this scenario changed after Native Americans served in the military and at home during World War II, when Indians from many lineages flocked to Indiana. —Amazon


Native Americans of East-Central Indiana

Chris Flook
Adult Nonfiction – 970.4 Flo

Native Americans lived, hunted and farmed in east-central Indiana for two thousand years before the area became a part of the Hoosier State. Place names like Delaware County, Muncie, Yorktown, and Anderson demonstrate the importance of the tribe in local history. Author Chris Flook explores the unique yet often untold history of the Native experience in east-central Indiana.


#NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women

Lisa Charleyboy, Mary Beth Leatherdale
Adult Nonfiction – 818 Not

Charleyboy's intent for this anthology is to provide a "space to not only write a love letter to all young Indigenous women trying to find their way, but also to help dispel those stereotypes so we can collectively move forward to a brighter future for all." Art, poetry, and prose created by Indigenous teenage girls and women that touch on a plethora of topics, from Standing Rock to ReMatriate, a collective of Indigenous women dedicated to showing the multiplicity of Indigenous identity through social media. A necessary addition in line with #ownvoices and We Need Diverse Books movements. —School Library Journal


A Warrior of the People: How Susan La Flesche Overcame Racial and Gender Inequality to Become America's First Indian Doctor

Joe Starita
Adult Nonfiction – 610.92 Picotte Sta

The story of an Indian woman who effectively became the chief of an entrenched patriarchal tribe, who crashed through thick walls of ethnic, racial and gender prejudice—then spent the rest of her life using a unique bi-cultural identity to improve the lot of her people, physically, emotionally, politically, and spiritually. In 1889, Susan La Flesche became the first Native American physician in U.S. history, earning her degree thirty-one years before women could vote—and thirty-five years before Indians could become citizens in their own country.


We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of the American Indian Movement

Dick Bancroft
Adult Nonfiction – 323.1196 Ban

The American Indian Movement, founded in 1968 in Minneapolis, burst into that turbulent time with passion, anger, and radical acts of resistance. Spurred by the Civil Rights movement, Native people began to protest the decades—centuries—of corruption, racism, and abuse they had endured. They argued for political, social, and cultural change, and they got attention. This is the inside record of a movement that began to change a nation.