Mixed Ages

Slaughterhouse Five

Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse-Five introduces us to Billy Pilgrim, a man who becomes 'unstuck in time' after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore. In a plot-scrambling display of virtuosity, we follow Pilgrim simultaneously through all phases of his life, concentrating on his (and Vonnegut's) shattering experience as an American prisoner of war who witnesses the firebombing of Dresden.

Slaughterhouse Five

Kurt Vonnegut
Vonnegu

Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse-Five introduces us to Billy Pilgrim, a man who becomes 'unstuck in time' after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore. In a plot-scrambling display of virtuosity, we follow Pilgrim simultaneously through all phases of his life, concentrating on his (and Vonnegut's) shattering experience as an American prisoner of war who witnesses the firebombing of Dresden. Slaughterhouse-Five is not only Vonnegut's most powerful book, it is also as important as any written since 1945. Like Catch-22, it fashions the author's experiences in the Second World War into an eloquent and deeply funny plea against butchery in the service of authority. Slaughterhouse-Five boasts the same imagination, humanity, and gleeful appreciation of the absurd found in Vonnegut's other works, but the book's basis in rock-hard, tragic fact gives it unique poignancy-and humor.

"Billy Pilgrim!"—Steph N., Assistant Manager ACS

Bicentennial Staff Picks

The Snowy Day

In 1962, Ezra Jack Keats's picture book The Snowy Day introduced readers to young Peter, the first African American protagonist in a full-color children's book, who traipsed alone through the snowy, wondrous sidewalks of New York City. The book was a runaway success, capturing the Caldecott Medal and selling more than two million copies. In The Snowy Day and subsequent books, Keats's awareness of the city, its daily hum, and the role of its children are deeply felt and delicately rendered in words and bright collages and paintings.

The Snowy Day

Ezra Jack Keats
741.642 Nah

In 1962, Ezra Jack Keats's picture book The Snowy Day introduced readers to young Peter, the first African American protagonist in a full-color children's book, who traipsed alone through the snowy, wondrous sidewalks of New York City. The book was a runaway success, capturing the Caldecott Medal and selling more than two million copies. In The Snowy Day and subsequent books, Keats's awareness of the city, its daily hum, and the role of its children are deeply felt and delicately rendered in words and bright collages and paintings. He made a prominent place for characters and places that had not been represented in children's books, saying about Peter, "My book would have him there simply because he should have been there all along."

"Perfectly paced masterpiece about the universal childhood love and awe for a snowy day. It's over 50 years old but the illustrations and story are as fresh as a newly rolled snowball."—Dana D., Librarian

Bicentennial Staff Picks

The Raven Boys

Though she is from a family of clairvoyants, Blue Sargent's only gift seems to be that she makes other people's talents stronger, and when she meets Gansey, one of the Raven Boys from the expensive Aglionby Academy, she discovers that he has talents of his own—and that together their talents are a dangerous mix.

The Raven Boys

Maggie Stiefvater
Y Stiefva
Series: Raven cycle

Though she is from a family of clairvoyants, Blue Sargent's only gift seems to be that she makes other people's talents stronger, and when she meets Gansey, one of the Raven Boys from the expensive Aglionby Academy, she discovers that he has talents of his own—and that together their talents are a dangerous mix.

"This book (as well as the rest of the Raven Cycle) has an incredible, unique tone that perfectly marries poetic prose and silly teen dialogue. This book is a great example of how YA can be really high quality literature!"—Sara, B., Materials Handler

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Cinder

As plague ravages the overcrowded Earth, observed by a ruthless lunar people, Cinder, a gifted mechanic and cyborg, becomes involved with handsome Prince Kai and must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect the world in this futuristic take on the Cinderella story.

"The whole series has amazing world building, 3-dimensional characters, and amazing character development."—Natasha S., Materials Handler

Cinder

Marissa Meyer
Y Meyer
Series: Lunar chronicles

As plague ravages the overcrowded Earth, observed by a ruthless lunar people, Cinder, a gifted mechanic and cyborg, becomes involved with handsome Prince Kai and must uncover secrets about her past in order to protect the world in this futuristic take on the Cinderella story.

"The whole series has amazing world building, 3-dimensional characters, and amazing character development."—Natasha S., Materials Handler

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Station Eleven

An audacious, darkly glittering novel about art, fame, and ambition set in the eerie days of civilization's collapse, from the author of three highly acclaimed previous novels. One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve.

Station Eleven

Emily St. John Manvel
SF Mandel

An audacious, darkly glittering novel about art, fame, and ambition set in the eerie days of civilization's collapse, from the author of three highly acclaimed previous novels. One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time-from the actor's early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains-this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: the actor, the man who tried to save him, the actor's first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Traveling Symphony, caught in the crosshairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet. Sometimes terrifying, sometimes tender, Station Eleven tells a story about the relationships that sustain us, the ephemeral nature of fame, and the beauty of the world as we know it.—Provided by publisher.

"Extremely well-written book about early post-apocalyptic period that is easy to read and understandable to all ages from teenagers on up. There is a key quote from Star Trek: Voyager series, along the lines of, 'Survival is not enough.' This is the book I sent my kids off to college with."—Jane W., El Centro Comunal Latino

Bicentennial Staff Picks

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

After Yeine Darr is summoned to the majestic city of Sky and named an heiress to the king of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, she is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had, drawing ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history. Original.—Baker & Taylor

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

N.K. Jemisin
SF Jemisin

After Yeine Darr is summoned to the majestic city of Sky and named an heiress to the king of the Hundred Thousand Kingdoms, she is thrust into a vicious power struggle with cousins she never knew she had, drawing ever closer to the secrets of her mother's death and her family's bloody history. Original.—Baker & Taylor

"All of Jemisin's novels read like poetry. This one is my favorite because the mythology and magic is wonderfully unique, I've found myself growing to love the characters, and the world-building is awe-inspiring. Jemisin has a gift for exploring difficult cultural issues through the lens of fantasy in a way that doesn't feel heavy-handed, but still manages to challenge me as a reader."—Shannon B., Senior Information Assistant

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Anne of Green Gables

The series chronicles the adventures of Anne Shirley, an 11-year-old orphan girl, who is sent to two middle-aged siblings, Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, by mistake in Prince Edward Island. Anne of Green Gables is a coming-of-age series during the late 19th and early 20th century.

Anne of Green Gables

L.M. Montgomery
J Montgom
Series: Anne of Green Gables

The series chronicles the adventures of Anne Shirley, an 11-year-old orphan girl, who is sent to two middle-aged siblings, Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, by mistake in Prince Edward Island. Anne of Green Gables is a coming-of-age series during the late 19th and early 20th century.

"Anne of Green Gables was the first chapter book I read between the ages 8-10 years-old. It was also the first book I had read where I could see myself in a character. Anne was an orphan who was very imaginative and a free-spirit. I was adopted, and an imaginative girl myself. Anne became my kindred spirit, and she taught me that being different, thinking abstractly, being creative and imaginative, and being adopted were not bad things, but marvelous things."—Meg A., ACS

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Have A Nice Day: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks

Have a Nice Day!: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks is an autobiography of former wrestler Mick Foley. It details his life all the way from his upbringing in New York to winning the WWF Championship from The Rock in December 1998. Foley had originally wanted the book to be called simply Blood and Sweatsocks, but this was eschewed in favor of his long-time catchphrase Have a Nice Day!, with the former being worked into the sub-title. The book debuted at #3 on the New York Times Best Seller List on November 7, 1999 and reached #1 on December 5.—Wikipedia


Mick Foley

Have a Nice Day!: A Tale of Blood and Sweatsocks is an autobiography of former wrestler Mick Foley. It details his life all the way from his upbringing in New York to winning the WWF Championship from The Rock in December 1998. Foley had originally wanted the book to be called simply Blood and Sweatsocks, but this was eschewed in favor of his long-time catchphrase Have a Nice Day!, with the former being worked into the sub-title. The book debuted at #3 on the New York Times Best Seller List on November 7, 1999 and reached #1 on December 5.—Wikipedia

"Foley is good. Bang Bang!"—Bill K., Materials Handler

Bicentennial Staff Picks

The Ghost Clause

It's been several months since Simon Inescort had a heart attack and keeled over the rail of a Nova Scotia-bound ferry. His widow, Lorca Pell, sold their farmhouse to newlyweds Zachary and Muriel after revealing that the deed contains a 'ghost clause,' an actual legal clause, not unheard of in Vermont, allowing for reimbursement if a recently purchased home turns out to be haunted.

The Ghost Clause

Howard Norman
Norman

It's been several months since Simon Inescort had a heart attack and keeled over the rail of a Nova Scotia-bound ferry. His widow, Lorca Pell, sold their farmhouse to newlyweds Zachary and Muriel after revealing that the deed contains a 'ghost clause,' an actual legal clause, not unheard of in Vermont, allowing for reimbursement if a recently purchased home turns out to be haunted. In fact, Simon finds himself still at home, replaying his marriage in his own mind, while also engaging in occasionally intimate observation of the new homeowners. When a child goes missing the Green Mountain Agency assigns Zachary, their rookie detective, but the case threatens the couple's domestic equilibrium.—adapted from jacket.

"This is a well written, thought provoking and a little bit sad, novel. I found it moving."—Chantal C., Information Assistant

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Harry Potter has never been the star of a Quidditch team, scoring points while riding a broom far above the ground. He knows no spells, has never helped to hatch a dragon, and has never worn a cloak of invisibility.

All he knows is a miserable life with the Dursleys, his horrible aunt and uncle, and their abominable son, Dudley—a great big swollen spoiled bully. Harry's room is a tiny closet at the foot of the stairs, and he hasn't had a birthday party in eleven years.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

J. K. Rowling
J Rowling
Series: Harry Potter

Harry Potter has never been the star of a Quidditch team, scoring points while riding a broom far above the ground. He knows no spells, has never helped to hatch a dragon, and has never worn a cloak of invisibility.

All he knows is a miserable life with the Dursleys, his horrible aunt and uncle, and their abominable son, Dudley—a great big swollen spoiled bully. Harry's room is a tiny closet at the foot of the stairs, and he hasn't had a birthday party in eleven years.

But all that is about to change when a mysterious letter arrives by owl messenger: a letter with an invitation to an incredible place that Harry—and anyone who reads about him—will find unforgettable.

For it's there that he finds not only friends, aerial sports, and magic in everything from classes to meals, but a great destiny that's been waiting for him... if Harry can survive the encounter.—Scholastic

"J. K. Rowling does a fabulous job creating such an engaging and fun world. I grew up with Harry, so they are still among my favorite books today. I have read the series countless times!"—Maggie H., Information Assistant

Bicentennial Staff Picks

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