Mixed Ages

Clan of the Cave Bear

A natural disaster leaves a young girl wandering alone in an unfamiliar and dangerous land until she is found by a woman of the Clan, people very different from her own kind. To them, blond, blue-eyed Ayla looks peculiar and ugly—she is one of the Others, those who have moved into their ancient homeland; but Iza cannot leave the girl to die and takes her with them. Iza and Creb, the old Mog-ur, grow to love her, and as Ayla learns the ways of the Clan and Iza’s way of healing, most come to accept her.

Clan of the Cave Bear

Jean Auel
electronic bk.
Series: The Earth's Children Series

A natural disaster leaves a young girl wandering alone in an unfamiliar and dangerous land until she is found by a woman of the Clan, people very different from her own kind. To them, blond, blue-eyed Ayla looks peculiar and ugly—she is one of the Others, those who have moved into their ancient homeland; but Iza cannot leave the girl to die and takes her with them. Iza and Creb, the old Mog-ur, grow to love her, and as Ayla learns the ways of the Clan and Iza’s way of healing, most come to accept her. But the brutal and proud youth who is destined to become the Clan’s next leader sees Ayla’s differences as a threat to his authority. He develops a deep and abiding hatred for the strange girl of the Others who lives in their midst, and is determined to get his revenge.

"This is an epic series taking place in the Ice Age and addresses the first interactions of the Neanderthals and Homo Sapiens. It is full of rich, detailed descriptions of the historical landscape and cultures. The main character Ayla is a strong, adventurous heroine who I find extremely likable and inspirational. Every time I read this series I want to be transported back in time to experience the story in person!"—Maggie H., Information Assistant

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Life

Autobiography of the guitarist, songwriter, singer, and founding member of the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards. With the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards lived the original rock and roll life.

Life

Keith Richards
780.92 Richards Ric

Autobiography of the guitarist, songwriter, singer, and founding member of the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards. With the Rolling Stones, Keith Richards lived the original rock and roll life. He tells his story of life in the crossfire hurricane; his listening obsessively to Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters records, learning guitar and forming a band with Mick Jagger and Brian Jones, the Rolling Stones' first fame and the notorious drug busts that led to his enduring image as outlaw folk hero, creating immortal riffs like the ones in "Jumping Jack Flash" and "Honky Tonk Women." He discusses falling in love with Anita Pallenberg and the death of Brian Jones, his tax exile in France, wildfire tours of the U.S., isolation and addiction, as well as falling in love with Patti Hansen, and his bitter estrangement from Jagger and subsequent reconciliation. He talks about his marriage, family, solo albums and Xpensive Winos; the road that goes on forever.

"The Rolling Stones are one of my favorite bands, and Keith Richards is my favorite rock star ever! He and the band have captured the imagination of the world for decades. 'Keef's' behind the scenes stories of the band's career are delicious!"—Kevin M., Teen and Digital Creativity Strategist

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Simulacra and Simulation

Simulacra and Simulation is a 1981 philosophical treatise by Jean Baudrillard, in which the author seeks to examine the relationships between reality, symbols, and society, in particular the significations and symbolism of culture and media involved in constructing an understanding of shared existence.Wikipedia

"... it's a useful tool for 21st century life."—Grier C., Access & Content Services Manager


Jean Baudrillard
194 Bau

Simulacra and Simulation is a 1981 philosophical treatise by Jean Baudrillard, in which the author seeks to examine the relationships between reality, symbols, and society, in particular the significations and symbolism of culture and media involved in constructing an understanding of shared existence.—Wikipedia

"... it's a useful tool for 21st century life."—Grier C., Access & Content Services Manager

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Suttree

Suttree is the story of Cornelius Suttree, who has forsaken a life of privilege with his prominent family to live in a dilapidated houseboat on the Tennessee River near Knoxville. Remaining on the margins of the outcast community there—a brilliantly imagined collection of eccentrics, criminals, and squatters—he rises above the physical and human squalor with detachment, humor, and dignity.—Blackwell North Amer.

Suttree

Cormac McCarthy
Mccarth

Suttree is the story of Cornelius Suttree, who has forsaken a life of privilege with his prominent family to live in a dilapidated houseboat on the Tennessee River near Knoxville. Remaining on the margins of the outcast community there—a brilliantly imagined collection of eccentrics, criminals, and squatters—he rises above the physical and human squalor with detachment, humor, and dignity.—Blackwell North Amer.

"It masterfully blends the picaresque works of Nelson Algren and the modernist, almost experimental interiority of William Faulkner into one extraordinary, harrowing character study. In spite of its grotesqueries, gallows humor, and often-tragic episodes, I find it the most life-affirming work of fiction I have ever read!"—Nile A., Master Control Operator

Bicentennial Staff Picks

The Go-Between

Summering with a fellow schoolboy on a great English estate, Leo, the hero of L. P. Hartley's finest novel, encounters a world of unimagined luxury. But when his friend's beautiful older sister enlists him as the unwitting messenger in her illicit love affair, the aftershocks will be felt for years. The inspiration for the brilliant Joseph Losey/Harold Pinter film starring Julie Christie and Alan Bates, The Go-Between is a masterpiece—a richly layered, spellbinding story about past and present, naivete; and knowledge, and the mysteries of the human heart.

The Go-Between

L.P. Hartley
Hartley

Summering with a fellow schoolboy on a great English estate, Leo, the hero of L. P. Hartley's finest novel, encounters a world of unimagined luxury. But when his friend's beautiful older sister enlists him as the unwitting messenger in her illicit love affair, the aftershocks will be felt for years. The inspiration for the brilliant Joseph Losey/Harold Pinter film starring Julie Christie and Alan Bates, The Go-Between is a masterpiece—a richly layered, spellbinding story about past and present, naivete; and knowledge, and the mysteries of the human heart. This volume includes, for the first time ever in North America, Hartley's own introduction to the novel.—Book cover.

"Exceptionally well-written coming-of-age story woven with moving ruminations on time, fate, and how  we remember our pasts."—Paul D., SIA

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Pantheologies: Gods, Worlds, Monsters

Pantheism is the idea that God and the world are identical―that the creator, sustainer, destroyer, and transformer of all things is the universe itself. From a monotheistic perspective, this notion is irremediably heretical since it suggests divinity might be material, mutable, and multiple. Since the excommunication of Baruch Spinoza, Western thought has therefore demonized what it calls pantheism, accusing it of incoherence, absurdity, and―with striking regularity―monstrosity.

Pantheologies: Gods, Worlds, Monsters

Mary-Jane Rubenstein
211.2 Rub

Pantheism is the idea that God and the world are identical―that the creator, sustainer, destroyer, and transformer of all things is the universe itself. From a monotheistic perspective, this notion is irremediably heretical since it suggests divinity might be material, mutable, and multiple. Since the excommunication of Baruch Spinoza, Western thought has therefore demonized what it calls pantheism, accusing it of incoherence, absurdity, and―with striking regularity―monstrosity. In this book, Mary-Jane Rubenstein investigates this perennial repugnance through a conceptual genealogy of pantheisms. What makes pantheism “monstrous”―at once repellent and seductive―is that it scrambles the raced and gendered distinctions that Western philosophy and theology insist on drawing between activity and passivity, spirit and matter, animacy and inanimacy, and creator and created. By rejecting the fundamental difference between God and world, pantheism threatens all the other oppositions that stem from it: light versus darkness, male versus female, and humans versus every other organism. If the panic over pantheism has to do with a fear of crossed boundaries and demolished hierarchies, then the question becomes what a present-day pantheism might disrupt and what it might reconfigure. Cobbling together heterogeneous sources―medieval heresies, their pre- and anti-Socratic forebears, general relativity, quantum mechanics, nonlinear biologies, multiverse and indigenous cosmologies, ecofeminism, animal and vegetal studies, and new and old materialisms―Rubenstein assembles possible pluralist pantheisms. By mobilizing this monstrous mixture of unintentional God-worlds, Pantheologies gives an old heresy the chance to renew our thinking.—Amazon.com.

"Astoundingly well-researched and thought-provoking look at off-beat religious philosophy."—Paul D., SIA

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Red Fish, Blue Fish

"From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere" . . . So begins this classic Beginner Book by Dr. Seuss. Beginning with just five fish and continuing into flights of fancy, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish celebrates how much fun imagination can be. From the can-opening Zans to the boxing Gox to the winking Yink who drinks pink ink, the silly rhymes and colorful cast of characters create an entertaining approach to reading that will have every child giggling from morning to night: "Today is gone. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one."

Red Fish, Blue Fish

Dr. Seuss
J-ER Seu

"From there to here, from here to there, funny things are everywhere" . . . So begins this classic Beginner Book by Dr. Seuss. Beginning with just five fish and continuing into flights of fancy, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish celebrates how much fun imagination can be. From the can-opening Zans to the boxing Gox to the winking Yink who drinks pink ink, the silly rhymes and colorful cast of characters create an entertaining approach to reading that will have every child giggling from morning to night: "Today is gone. Today was fun. Tomorrow is another one."

"It was the first book I read, all by myself."—Jacqueline L., COCU Senior Information Assistant (VITAL)

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Lost Horizon

Following a plane crash in the Himalayan mountains, a lost group of Englishmen and Americans stumble upon the dream-like, utopian world of Shangri-La, where life is eternal and civilization refined.

"It is the first book to mention Shangri-la."—Annise B., Librarian

Lost Horizon

James Hilton
Hilton

Following a plane crash in the Himalayan mountains, a lost group of Englishmen and Americans stumble upon the dream-like, utopian world of Shangri-La, where life is eternal and civilization refined.

"It is the first book to mention Shangri-la."—Annise B., Librarian

Bicentennial Staff Picks

The Never Game

From the bestselling and award-winning master of suspense, the first novel in a thrilling new series, introducing Colter Shaw. A young woman has gone missing in Silicon Valley and her father has hired Colter Shaw to find her. The son of a survivalist family, Shaw is an expert tracker. Now he makes a living as a "reward seeker," traveling the country to help police solve crimes and private citizens locate missing persons. But what seems a simple investigation quickly thrusts him into the dark heart of America's tech hub and the cutthroat billion-dollar video-gaming industry.

The Never Game

Jeffery Deaver
Deaver

From the bestselling and award-winning master of suspense, the first novel in a thrilling new series, introducing Colter Shaw. A young woman has gone missing in Silicon Valley and her father has hired Colter Shaw to find her. The son of a survivalist family, Shaw is an expert tracker. Now he makes a living as a "reward seeker," traveling the country to help police solve crimes and private citizens locate missing persons. But what seems a simple investigation quickly thrusts him into the dark heart of America's tech hub and the cutthroat billion-dollar video-gaming industry. When another victim is kidnapped, the clues point to one video game with a troubled past—The Whispering Man. In that game, the player has to survive after being abandoned in an inhospitable setting with five random objects. Is a madman bringing the game to life? Shaw finds himself caught in a cat-and-mouse game, risking his own life to save the victims even as he pursues the kidnapper across both Silicon Valley and the dark 'net. Encountering eccentric game designers, trigger-happy gamers and ruthless tech titans, he soon learns that he isn't the only one on the hunt: someone is on his trail and closing fast. The Never Game proves once more why Deaver is a genius when it comes to manipulation and deception.—Associated Press

"The plot involves a devious way to influence voters who like video games and a killer who is obsessed with video games. Takes place in Silicon Valley."—Gary L., Finance

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Wolf Hall

"This title is a new take on the story of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. Told from the perspective of Thomas Cromwell, the king's chief minister, who rose through his intelligence and grit from a common birth to become one of the most powerful men of his time. Cromwell's humor and outsider's status provides a fascinating look at court life, the people who surround the king, and the king and his mistress. Mantel's depiction of Cromwell's wit and insight creates a new spin to an old story."—Elizabeth G., Adult Audience Strategist

Wolf Hall

Hilary Mantel
Mantel

"This title is a new take on the story of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn. Told from the perspective of Thomas Cromwell, the king's chief minister, who rose through his intelligence and grit from a common birth to become one of the most powerful men of his time. Cromwell's humor and outsider's status provides a fascinating look at court life, the people who surround the king, and the king and his mistress. Mantel's depiction of Cromwell's wit and insight creates a new spin to an old story."—Elizabeth G., Adult Audience Strategist

Bicentennial Staff Picks

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Mixed Ages