Teens

The Ground Floor

The Ground Floor is a space for teens
A giant space just for teens at the Main Library. The Ground Floor is your space to make, create, and hang out. Expect special guests, pop-up events, and the unexpected!
 
The Ground Floor is open:
Monday–Thursday: 3–9 PM
Friday: 3–6 PM
Saturday–Sunday: Noon–6 PM
 
The Ground Floor is for ages 12–19 only. Everyone is invited to check out  Level Up, a space with digital creativity tools for all ages, including reservable video and audio production studios.
 
The Ground Floor facilitates teen leadership, creativity, collaborative work, quiet study, and recreation.

Krampus Night

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Krampus Night is almost here! The Krampus, a mythical horned creature of ancient Germanic legend, is often seen in folklore accompanying St. Nick and punishing wicked children. Its story—and the festivities surrounding it—has experienced a recent surge of popularity, with marches and parades throughout the winter holidays in Europe and the United States.

Immigrant Voices

american_street.jpgThis year, several young adult books were published about teen immigrants and their experiences living in the U.S. These stories explore the challenges involved in moving to a new country, as well as issues related to race, culture, identity, and community.

If you’re looking for a story told from a different perspective, check out one of these reads featuring teen immigrant characters!

American Street by Ibi Zoboi

National Suicide Prevention Week

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PHOTO: Helen Harrop

September 11–17 is National Suicide Prevention Week, a good time for conversations about mental health with loved ones. Reading about another person’s experience with anxiety or depression—two issues facing many of today’s youth—can be incredibly empowering as they learn to deal with life's problems, and remind them they're not alone.

International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples

Today is International Day of the World's Indigenous Peoples, and the tenth anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Today we honor the contributions of the world's indigenous peoples—the descendants of a given region's original inhabitants—and the cultural heritage with which they continue to identify.

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